PRESS RELEASE

FEMALE STRENGTH
Sept. 12 - Oct. 25, 2014


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PRESS RELEASE FOR GALLERY 57 UNDERGROUND SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER   
EXHIBITION AT THE DA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Gallery 57 Underground, a non-profit contemporary art gallery in the Pomona Arts colony, will present an exhibition entitled “Feminine Strength” featuring the works of Jeanne Andersen, Georga Garside, and Sharon Algozer in the gallery’s new quarters at the Da Center for the Arts at 252-D on Main Street in Pomona. The exhibition runs  from Friday, September 12 through Saturday, October 25. Receptions will take place on Saturday, September 13 and Saturday, October 11 from 6-9 p.m. Regular gallery hours are Friday and Saturday from 12-4. Phone number at the Da is 909-397-9716.

Jeanne Andersen uses pen and ink to depict strong women from the old testament, who were forced to make difficult decisions and engage in dangerous actions. To convey the plight of these forceful women Andersen uses complex compositions which mirror the trauma and fear experienced by such women as Hannah and Tamar.  The powerful use of line and the strong contrasts between light and dark convey the wrenching emotional situations these women had to endure.

Georga Garside has chosen as her subjects strong 20th and 21st century women who have made societal contributions by means of their courage, stamina, and determination.  The impetus to Garside’s inspiration stems from a pastor’s comment that “Women are the weaker vessel.” To disprove this viewpoint she uses mixed media to present an ironic interpretation of the pastor’s comment by depicting  brave women such as Malala, the young girl shot by the Taliban for going to school, Marlene Dietrich, the actress who defied Hitler, and Dolores Huerta, a leader of the United Farm Workers Union.

Fiber artist Sharon Algozer has chosen to examine the strength of female figures in certain historical works of art by examining their use of color.  Drawing inspiration from artists such as Gustav Klimt (Austrian, 1862-1918) and Georges Lacombe (French, 1898-1916), she has created freeform abstract sculptures which stress the force of color contrasts and gradations used in the chosen works of art.  Interested in the concept that when one views any object  the color is generally perceived  before the object itself, Algozer has interpreted the portrayal of strong women in art history through the impact of color alone rather than the representation of any actual figures.